Women Physicians Lack Equality

While the number of women physicians practicing in the U.S. has grown, their salaries lag behind their male peers’

By UO Staff | September/October 2008 | Vital Stats

 

According to the American Medical Association (AMA), the number of women in medicine has grown by roughly 140 percent in the past three decades. But in an early 2008 report to the AMA Board of Trustees on “Gender Disparities in Physician Income and Advancement,” AMA Chairman Edward L. Langston reported that despite the growing numbers of women in medicine, female physicians consistently lag behind their male counterparts in professional advancement and annual compensation.

Average Compensation for 2007

By specialty, in descending order

Source: 2008 LocumTenens.com Physician Compensation and Satisfaction Survey. There were more than 3,000 respondents. Sixty-six percent of respondents were male; 34 percent female.

Source: 2008 LocumTenens.com Physician Compensation and Satisfaction Survey. There were more than 3,000 respondents. Sixty-six percent of respondents were male; 34 percent female.

Data from the 2000 U.S. Census show that, on average, female physicians earn about 63 percent of the median male physician income, which at that time was $181,200. Dr. Langston also reported that: “The AMA identified similar differences through its Socioeconomic Monitoring System (SMS) surveys and Patient Care Physician Surveys (PCPS). Income data from 1990-2000 indicated that the median income of female physicians was consistently less than male physicians, with females earning 62 percent of male physician median income in 2000.”

LocumTenens.com’s 2008 physician compensation survey data appear to be fairly consistent with U.S. Census and AMA data.  Female physician salaries averaged approximately 67 percent of the average male physician salary for employer-based and private-practice, according to the 2008 LocumTenens.com survey. Clearly, there is room for improvement in female doctors’ pay

 

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