Who’s making what?

More than three-quarters of physician specialties saw increased compensation in 2009

By PracticeLink Staff | Spring 2011 | Vital Stats

 

Who's Making What

American Medical Group Association 2010 Medical Group Compensation and Financial Survey 2010 Report Based on 2009 Data Survey at a Glance. *M.D. reported, as opposed to Ph.D. Not all specialties are included in this chart.

WITH THE COST OF EVERYTHING RISING—from food to gas to tuition for schools— here’s some good financial news: Overall, physicians in 76 percent of specialties saw their compensation rise in 2009.

Physicians specializing in pulmonary disease, dermatology and urology saw among the biggest compensation increases; for specialties overall, the average was a 3.4 percent rise.

The highest-paid specialties reported include cardiac and thoracic surgery, orthopedic surgery and subspecialties, cardiology-cath lab, and diagnostic radiology-interventional (in bold at right).

Those compensation figures are detailed in the American Medical Group Association’s 2010 Compensation and Financial Survey (2009 data).

Notes the report: “Many factors influence a change in physician compensation, some of which are market demand for certain specialists and new technologies or new procedures that impact the physician’s overall productivity.”

All about the location?
In a recent PracticeLink poll, we asked physicians: 
“Which of the following factors are important to you when you are reading an online job posting?”
Here are their top four answers:

All About Location—Survey Questions

Source: This survey was sent to 1,000 randomly selected email addresses from the PracticeLink Candidate Database. Multiple responses were allowed for some questions.

 

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