Joshua D. Lenchus, D.O.

By PracticeLink Staff | Snapshot

 

Joshua Lenchus, D.O.

 

Work
Assistant professor of clinical medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; associate program director, Jackson Memorial Hospital Internal Medicine Residency Training Program; associate director, UM-JMH Center for Patient Safety.

Education
MEDICAL SCHOOL: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine
INTERNSHIP: Broward General Medical Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
RESIDENCY: Internal medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami
IN PRACTICE SINCE:  2004

Personal
Originally from Brooklyn, N.Y. Married with two sons (newborn not pictured). Hobbies include exercising, traveling, politics, and military and American history.

How did you find your first job out of residency?
I heard that a position was open at my residency institution, so I pursued it because I really wanted to remain in academics. I also interviewed with a couple of local hospitals, and a contract group. Those opportunities were discovered in the classified section of various journals and using placement firms.

What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?
Figure out exactly what you will and will not accept. …It is best to craft a solid résumé or curriculum vitae (CV). Be honest about what you want with an employer. Speak to those who have finished training before you, and solicit their opinion and feedback about your plan.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job search?
I was quite surprised about how little I was offered. Perhaps some of that was staying in academics, but there really was a significant disparity in pay between academia and community work.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?
We desperately need to incorporate the business and politics of medicine, not just in school, but residencies as well. Graduates (of school or training) are sorely ill-prepared to deal with these critical aspects of the practice of medicine.

Any other advice?

  • Find a mentor, someone who you can speak with plainly and honestly. Do not be shy about what you are looking for and ask for his/her help.
  • Forget the money; pick a position that you enjoy, that you can see yourself doing day after day. Do what makes you happy, not what makes you wealthy.

*Know a physician who’d make a great future “Snapshot”? Nominate them by posting their photo to our wall on Facebook.com/PracticeLink, or just email editor@PracticeLink.com

 

Topics: , ,

Comments are closed.