Ace The Interview

One part preparation, one part professionalism, and a touch of class. Mix well and you have a recipe for success.

By Marcia Travelstead | Feature Articles | Winter 2010

 

Ace the Interview

Ace the Interview

CONGRATULATONS! After all those years of hard study and specialized training, you’re ready to embark on the adventure of entering the job market. You’ve searched through ads on the Internet and trade publications and have sent your CV to the physician opportunities that have met your interest. However, when that call comes for an interview, are you going to be ready? Chances are you’ve had little experience in the art of interviewing, and the medical school you attended probably didn’t teach you interviewing techniques. So how should a physician candidate prepare? more »

 

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Negotiate Like a Pro

Although it may seem like an intimidating process, negotiating a contract doesn't have to paralyze you. Know what you want, be willing to ask for it, and have a little help in your corner.

By Lori Herring | Feature Articles | Winter 2010

 

Ramona Kwapiszewski, MD, a physician with Muskegon Family Care in Muskegon, Michigan, understands that “it’s all business and shouldn’t be taken personally” when it comes to job negotiations. Kwapiszewski says “What’s important is quality of life, which people don’t tend to write into a contract.”

Ramona Kwapiszewski, MD, a physician with Muskegon Family Care in Muskegon, Michigan, understands that “it’s all business and shouldn’t be taken personally” when it comes to job negotiations. Kwapiszewski says “What’s important is quality of life, which people don’t tend to write into a contract.”

When Ramona Kwapiszewski, MD, left private practice to pursue a position at a community health center in Muskegon, Michigan, she realized job negotiations with a federally qualified health center like Muskegon Family Care would be limited. “I knew what to expect and there wasn’t much to negotiate other than personal preferences,” she says. “I felt comfortable with what I wanted; I clearly defined what I wanted”— and she got it.

Nephrologist Blake Shusterman, MD, in a private practice group in Greenville, South Carolina, has a different story to tell. Although he felt primed for negotiation from instruction he received during his fellowship program at the University of Virginia, he thinks talks fell flat. “I felt I was well prepared going in, but I really did not end up with a lot of negotiating power,” he says. “Maybe I just didn’t do a very good job.” more »

 

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The Opportunity of Ownership

The benefits of partnership are considerable but so are the risks. If a job has ownership potential, it's crucial to look for any cracks in the relationship before setting sail.

By Karen Appold | Feature Articles | Winter 2010

 

Stephen C. Beeson, MD, author and medical director at Studor Group says, “You must prove your abilities and your willingness to be a team player. As a shareholder, you’ll have a small ownership position. If you don’t make shareholder, your contract isn’t renewed.”

Stephen C. Beeson, MD, author and medical director at Studor Group says, “You must prove your abilities and your willingness to be a team player. As a shareholder, you’ll have a small ownership position. If you don’t make shareholder, your contract isn’t renewed.”

“We are in the same boat.” When Pope Clement I uttered those words to the church in Corinth sometime in the first century A.D., there is likely no chance he thought the phrase might one day apply to physician partnerships, but the words are as apt now as then.

Physicians who join together as business partners are in the same boat and must sink or swim together. It therefore becomes critical that a physician who seeks to join a practice with partnership potential does as much as possible upfront to ensure that the relationship is seaworthy.

Jeffrey Long, MD, a board-certified radiation oncologist at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center at Terrebonne General Medical Center in Houma, Louisiana, has worked as an employed physician, in an academic setting, and in partnerships. Long appreciates the increased stability and potentially higher income that a partnership affords. He says, “A partnership implies that there is a mutual commitment, that we are together for the long run, and that we will work hard to ensure the group’s success,” he says.

“The stakes are high when seeking a partnership,” Long says. “As a partner, you are a lot less likely to change jobs than in another arrangement. Usually, you set yourself up for a long-term relationship that could last years, decades, or perhaps even until retirement,” he says. “It’s a balancing act. You must weigh the risks and benefits.” more »

 

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National Practitioner Data Bank—and
Your Career

Knowing what information the data bank contains - and correcting any errors - could be critical to credentialing for new jobs or applications to professional organizations.

By Bruce Armon and Justin Ettelson | Legal Matters | Winter 2010

 

Are you applying for employment or affiliation with a health care entity? Do you have an application pending before a state licensing board? Do you have clinical privileges at a hospital? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, then you should be aware of the importance the National Practitioner Data Bank maintained by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) can have on you and your career. more »

 

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Giving it Back to Uncle Sam

Make up for declining reimbursements with financial efficiency and tax savings.

By Carole c. Foos, CPA and David B. Mandell, JD, MBA | Financial Fitness | Winter 2010

 

The proposed medicare cuts in reimbursements for most physicians go from frustrating to downright scary. Many of our clients were annoyed by the cuts in the past few years, and the proposed reductions are just more of the same. Layer on top of this the proposed healthcare overhaul which at the time of press is still unclear (yet all rhetoric out of Washington seems to expect physicians to sacrifice yet again), and it starts to feel like the federal government is determined to make it difficult for you to prosper. more »

 

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Birmingham, AL – The Magic City

After a century of industrialization and race-related turmoil, Birmingham - one of the South's most unusual cities - has become a center for medical care and research.

By Eileen Lockwood | Live & Practice | Winter 2010

 

A charming southern home in Birmingham's historic Highland Park district.

A charming southern home in Birmingham's historic Highland Park district.

For Kirk Thame, MD, Birmingham, Alabama, was a surprise in at least two ways. Born and bred in Kingston, Jamaica, the pediatric gastroenterologist was looking for a practice somewhere in the South to be near family members in Miami. “I didn’t expect Birmingham to look the way it does,” he says. “I expected a big, dirty city, a version of New York. But it actually has a pleasant, suburban feel, and the hospital itself (Children’s Health System) suited my needs in many ways.”

His second surprise was that he settled at all in what was once known as the Pittsburgh of the South. “I actually interviewed somewhere else first, but I scheduled an interview at Birmingham just to have a comparison. And I ended up staying.”

Thame had completed training at hospitals in Miami and St. Louis before returning to the University Hospital of the West Indies, part of the complex where he completed medical school. After six years, though, he made the decision to relocate for several reasons, he says. “There were frustrations in terms of limitations of living in a Third World country, including work attitudes and, what was worse, not having [needed equipment and other supplies].” more »

 

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The Power of Asking

There is no weakness in asking. If we wait for someone to give us what we want, chances are we might never get it.

By Leslie A. Knight, MD, FAAFP | Remarks | Winter 2010

 

If you made a list of things you were given just because you asked for them, how long would your list be? First class upgrades? Airport meal tickets? Rental car upgrades? Full college and medical school scholarships? Paid trips to professional meetings? Increased responsibilities at work? more »

 

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