Is Social Media the New Job Search Engine?

Attention Bloggers, Twitterers and Facebook Friends: Social networking is the up-and-coming way to job hunt, but the tried and true methods remain part of the marketing mix. How to use social media safely, learn online etiquette, and see how recruiters do—and don't—look at your online activity.

By Julie Sturgeon & Karen Edwards | Feature Articles | Summer 2009

 

Is Social Media the New Job Search Engine?

Is Social Media the New Job Search Engine?

For years, the internet has been shifting from an information repository to a network of individuals who communicate with each other. Web 2.0 is the term that describes that trend. It not only includes social networking sites, such as MySpace, Facebook, and LinkedIn, but also sites that depend on users for content—YouTube and Wikipedia, for example. Businesses, like Amazon, also build and interact with communities of customers on their sites. Blogging and micro-blogging (like Twitter), both of which are forms of web journaling, are the newest Web 2.0 developments.

The data shows social networking is huge. Facebook, for example, claims to have 175 million users, half of whom are in college. The fastest growing segment of Facebook users, in fact, is age 30 and older. YouTube says 10 hours of video are uploaded to its site every minute, primarily by 18- to 34-year olds, although its demographic reaches as high as 55 years. And MySpace has more than 110 million users, age 18 and older. more »

 

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Putting Out the Fires of Discontent

Preventing staff burnout improves morale, reduces employee turnover, and boosts the bottom line. What you must know.

By Karen Childress | Feature Articles | Summer 2009

 


Dr. Richard Lander values positive working relationships with his staff. Lander owns a four-physician pediatric practice in Livingston, New Jersey

Dr. Richard Lander values positive working relationships with his staff. Lander owns a four-physician pediatric practice in Livingston, New Jersey

Everyone has the occasional bad day at work. We might feel stressed about having too much to accomplish in too short a time or simply feel unmotivated to do what is right in front of us. Frustration about situations or office policies over which we have little control is common. And who hasn’t become annoyed with their co-workers from time to time? But there is a significant difference between the everyday stresses that come with the territory in any job and the syndrome known as burnout.

According to Christina Maslach, PhD, professor of psychology at the University of California Berkeley and author of several books on career burnout, the terms stress and burnout are often used interchangeably. Burnout, however, is a syndrome that consists of a unique set of three factors: exhaustion, cynicism, and negative feelings toward oneself. more »

 

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Who is Dr. Wiki and Why You Need to Know

Managing the risks of online medical communities. How to safely enjoy your time online.

By Bruce Armon & Jim Keller | Legal Matters | Summer 2009

 

American society is more wired than ever. “Texting,” emailing, and “tweeting” have all but replaced calling and writing. Online social networking communities like Facebook.com™ and MySpace.com™ are quickly growing in popularity. It is not just teenagers and college students who are partaking. Professionals, including physicians, are joining and participating in online networks. Several networks have been created for use exclusively for physicians including Sermo.com™ and Medpedia.com™. Other networks are designed to be forums to exchange information between physicians and patients. While patients can benefit from their physicians’ ability to connect and consult with thousands of other physicians in the United States and around the world regarding treatment advice or similar case studies, these online communities can expose physicians to a host of risks and potential liabilities. more »

 

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Medical Software Goes Mobile

More physicians are implementing these hi-tech products, which save patients, slash costs and curtail time.

By David Geer | Summer 2009 | Tech Notes

 

Devices such as the iPhone provide the medical software you're used to—whereever you are.

A drug interaction application on the Apple iPhone

What physician wouldn’t love a product that allows access to broad range of medical reference information and comprehensive patient data? Add to that the time-saving feature of increased hospital rounding speed, as well as charge capturing accuracy, and you have a “dream product.” Several such software products are now available, and they’re quickly becoming an indispensible element of physicians’ daily practice.

Epocrates proves “Essential” at UCLA

John Luo, MD, teaches those who practice in an academic medical setting. He is the associate director of psychiatric training at UCLA. He is required to use Epocrates Essentials, a comprehensive medical information resource for mobile devices. “It is a budgeted item,” Luo says.

Epocrates Essentials enables Luo and students to check on lab work and norms for the hospital while on the move. It also enables him to arrive at virtual diagnoses and to check multiple drug interactions for patients.

more »

 

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The Picture is Clear

Radiology the leader in MGMA's 2008 survey

By UO Staff | Summer 2009 | Vital Stats

 

Radiology tops the list of starting salaries for physicians according to the Medical Group Management Association’s (MGMA) 2008 Physician Compensation and Production Survey. While nuclear medicine radiology tops the charts with a starting median salary of more than $478,000, diagnostic noninvasive radiology comes in at fourth on the list with a median starting salary of $360,000. Radiology holds up well for established radiologists who practice either nuclear or diagnostic radiology, with both subspecialties in the top three. Established diagnostic radiologists earn median salaries of more than $450,000 followed closely by $413,000 for their colleagues in nuclear radiology. more »

 

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Bismarck, ND – “North Dakota Nice”

In Bismarck, a strong economy blends seamlessly with good old-fashioned Midwestern values and modern medicine

By Eileen Lockwood | Live & Practice | Summer 2009

 

The State Library and Capitol Tower are commanding features of North Dakota’s Capitol Complex located in Bismarck.

The State Library and Capitol Tower are commanding features of North Dakota’s Capitol Complex located in Bismarck.

City names have a way of changing before they settle down. Sometimes that’s because people realize monikers like Pigville could make them  laughingstocks, or because names like Bombay fall victim to political correctness. In the case of North Dakota’s capital, though, name change had a calculated purpose.

The city debuted as Edwinton in 1872, honoring a Northern Pacific railroad engineer named Edwin M. Johnson. But then city leaders got a brighter idea: “Let’s use a name that will attract investment in ongoing railroad construction, and newcomers with strong work ethics.” In other words, German money and German immigrants. The winning name: Bismarck, for German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, the leader who had turned a patchwork of states into one country.

So, on July 17, 1873, the city was newly baptized. It was officially incorporated in 1875. After some lively “negotiations,” aka hog trading, in 1883, the town on the Missouri River became the capital of Dakota Territory. Six years later, Bismarck became the capital of the newly minted state of North Dakota. more »

 

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A Valid Career for the Non-enlisted Physician

41 different specialties present an enticing opportunity to care for the military and their families.

By Allison B. McCarthy, MBA | Remarks | Summer 2009

 

A friend’s 16-year-old grandson is enamored with the prospect of joining the Army. His father, on the other hand, a Coast Guard warrant officer, would prefer he look at that primarily domestic-based service branch, so he would be more likely stationed within the United States’ jurisdiction. His view of the Army is it’s a hard life, with lots of battle scenarios, presenting potential harm to his son.

I suspect if you talk with friends and family, you will find lots of opinions about an Army career. But like many things, perception doesn’t always match reality. In fact, our recent work with the Raymond W. Bliss Army Health Center in Fort Huachuca, Arizona has turned my original thinking on its head. more »

 

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Social Media and Sarcastic Servers

By Mollie Vento Hudson, Editor | Editor's Note | Summer 2009

 

Mollie Vento Hudson, Editor

Mollie Vento Hudson, Editor

I recently attended a conference during which one speaker declared social media was the future of organizational success; any business that didn’t include Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, and their counterparts among their marketing strategies was ignoring the future—and some would argue the current—technology in which everyone must communicate. I listened with a mixture of interest and anxiety, being closer to the phobic end of the Likert scale of technology; I realized, like it or not, the unrelenting flow of change would mean sometime soon I must not only master the tech, but develop some level of comfort— however  egrudgingly—with this trend.

At this same conference, (in San Antonio, TX) a woman from a small city in rural Alaska attending alone asked if we minded if she joined my colleague and me for dinner that night. We made plans to meet and ended up at a somewhat raucous restaurant where the specialty is “service with sarcasm.” Having been raised in a large, boisterous family and surrounded most of my working life with people of outgoing, even warped but delightfully engaging, personalities, I was perfectly capable of holding my own with the waiter, as was my colleague. The woman from Alaska, however, was not. She started out just saying, “Oh, my,” but by the time dinner was over, it was clear she was convinced the big city was, at the very least, plagued with weirdoes. The next day, she merely waived from across the room at us, and didn’t ask to join us for lunch. more »

 

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Summer 2009, and Powered by PracticeLink

By Barbara Barry, Publisher | Editor's Note | Summer 2009

 

Barbara Barry

Barbara Barry

Exciting things are happening here at Unique Opportunities. Our publishing company is now a part of PracticeLink®, the leading online job bank for physicians. Approximately 18,000 physicians every year use PracticeLink to research job opportunities across the nation. Our magazine’s title will now be “Unique Opportunities Powered by PracticeLink.” Much more than a mere name change, this partnership is a synergistic union of two teams with complementary strengths and talents. This synergy means that you will not only continue to receive UO’s same physician-specific career development guidance in a hands-on, take-home paper format, but you’ll also benefit from the best the Web has to offer for conducting a practice search—www.practicelink.com. We at UO couldn’t be happier to have the PracticeLink team to partner with for the future.

You may have also noticed that we have an updated look with this—our first ever, Summer issue. In the interest of the environment, as well as wanting to create a very easy-to-read product, our magazine is now printed on matte, 100-percent recyclable paper. We’ve also gone to quarterly issues—from bimonthly, so you’ll receive UO four times per year instead of six. You will still get the same amount of career-boosting information, however, as we plan to keep the same number of stories over the year the same. We stand by our pledge to provide the highest quality, purest career-specific content of any magazine for physicians, and now, we’ll be greener as well. more »

 

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