Jonathan Lee, MD

Snapshot | Summer 2012

 

Work

Private practice at the Oregon Ear, Nose and Throat Center in Medford and Ashland, Ore.

Training

RESIDENCY: Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, Rochester, Minn.

IN PRACTICE SINCE: 2006

Personal

Lee and his wife, Denison, have a 3-year-old daughter, Elsa. He enjoys whitewater boating, Telemark skiing and playing guitar.

What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?

Prioritize your search criteria and be thorough. If location is your highest priority, for example, look for ads in that locale, but also pull the names of doctors and practices in those areas that aren’t advertising and send them letters of inquiry and a CV. Talk to faculty and alumni of your residency
program to find positions they have heard about through the grapevine.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job?

The best leads I found came from “cold calls” to practices that hadn’t necessarily started to advertise or recruit for a new position. In many cases, they had only informally entertained the idea of adding a new partner, and
they were willing to explore the idea further only after I called.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?

Medical school and residency can prepare you with the knowledge needed to do your job, but they have a much smaller impact on how you do your job. Softer skills like the ability to communicate clearly, show compassion, feel empathy, and stay organized are primarily developed outside of medical school.

I used to work as a whitewater rafting guide, and I learned more about communication doing that than I ever learned in medical school. In practice, most patients will assume you’ve had good medical training. How well they respond to you and how much they trust you, though, will depend primarily on how well you synthesize those softer skills with your medical knowledge.

Anything particularly unique about your job search?

The decision about which practice I wanted to join was ultimately mine, but my wife was completely involved as well. To start our search, I opened a map and asked her to pick out 10 places she would want to live. We started with that, cross-referenced it with my list of desired locations and practice characteristics, and worked forward from there.

Any other advice?

Pick great partners who are open and willing to share their experiences because they are some of your best resources in both practice and business. I discuss cases with my partners every day, and I have learned 80 percent of what I know about the business of medicine from them as well. There are so many different types of practice models that medical schools couldn’t usefully teach you everything you need to know about how each one operates. Your partners, however, can tell you a lot about how the business side of your particular practice works.

 

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Chafik Assal, M.D.

Snapshot | Spring 2012

 

Work
Employer: Arrhythmia Treatment Associates, PLLC; Charleston Area Medical Center; Charleston, W.Va.

Training
Residency: Internal Medicine: Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, 2006
Fellowships: Intercardiovascular Medicine: Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pa., 2009
Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology: Geisinger Medical Center, 2010
In practice since: October, 2010

Chafik Assal, M.D.

Personal
Volunteer Arabic instructor at St. George Cathedral in Charleston, W.Va. Passionate about learning foreign languages—speaks Arabic, English, Spanish and French. Enjoys traveling and exploring the world, learning about other people’s cultures, languages and customs. Also likes hiking, swimming and photography.

What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?
Be true to yourself. This is the point where you choose where and how your life is going to be. Know what you are looking for and go where you think you will be content. No single opportunity is perfect, but you have to choose what seems “right” for you. Compare the pros and cons of each opportunity, and choose the one with more advantages.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job?
It was a major transition from fellowship to practice in terms of the growing responsibilities and having to make independent medical and business decisions that impact patients, staff, other physicians and myself. The dynamics of the relationship between the referring physicians and the consultant was a major learning experience.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?
The business side of medicine. This is extremely helpful in the process of choosing the right job and also during the interview and negotiation stage.

Anything particularly unique about your job search?
Not all medical specialty jobs are created equally. Finding a job in a highly specialized, constantly evolving field of medicine, such as cardiac electro-physiology, is particularly distinguished as there is the important need for a supportive cardiology community to sustain the practice.
In addition, the hospital system needs to offer the optimal work environment especially in terms of modern equipment, technology and computer software.
These factors are essential to my specialty as they provide the physician the optimal environment to perform well and grow in experience and knowledge while in practice.

Any other advice?
I advise residents and fellows to make the most of their post-graduate training and focus on being confident with their medical knowledge and skills. This is the key to success in any medical job type they choose because it allows them to gain the trust of the medical community, which is pivotal in growing a practice and growing as individuals and physicians.

 

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Scott C. Lindsay, D.O.

Snapshot

 

Work
Private practice in Wilmington, Ohio

Education
Medical school: Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, 2005
Residency:
General surgery: Community General Osteopathic Hospital at Pinnacle Health, Harrisburg, Pa., 2009
Plastic and reconstructive surgery: Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine at Doctors Hospital-Ohio Health, Columbus, Ohio, 2011

In practice since: September, 2011

Personal
Family includes wife, Heidi, and daughter, Alexa (2 ½). Lindsay enjoys gardening, cooking, spending time with his family, hunting and fishing. He’s a die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers and Penguins fan, and a proud member of the Steelers Nation.

What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?
Go where you want to go. Whether you’re going to be an employed physician or taking the entrepreneur route and opening a practice, the practice will grow no matter where you are. You have to be happy in your surroundings, and your family has to be happy. I grew up in a tiny town in a rural area, and it was important to finally get back to that setting.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job or job search?
I opened my practice immediately after finishing residency, and I’ve been amazed at how little we learn about the business side of medicine during training. If you know you’re opening a practice, you have to start long in advance to start getting the key pieces in place to get it off the ground. I started the process almost a year before I finished residency.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?
I think some business training is critical, especially if you’re planning to open a practice. I often joked that I felt like I was trying to get my MBA via Google as I was opening my practice.

Anything particularly unique about your job search?
Opening a practice is an enormous challenge on many levels. Utilize every resource you can, including your family, friends and colleagues. The advice I received from my colleagues was invaluable, and I’m still relying on them today.

Any other advice?
Opening a practice is a daunting prospect, especially financially. It’s difficult on many levels, and it takes an immense amount of work and dedication. I put in just as many hours now as in training because it’s my practice and I want to make sure it’s done right. But at the end of the day, I’m the boss and get to call the shots, and that makes it worth it. I’m just careful and diligent about balancing my work and family. They are ultimately the most important thing in all of this, and I’m blessed to have such a wonderful wife and daughter!

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Amy Derick, M.D.

By PracticeLink Staff | Fall 2011 | Snapshot

 

Amy Derick, M.D. dermatologist

Amy Derick, M.D., started her dermatology practice fresh out of residency. She credits a supportive family—including husband Michael and sons Henry and Charlie—with helping her achieve success. Photograph by Peter Wynn Thompson

Work
Board-certified dermatologist at Derick Dermatology, LLC, in Barrington, Ill.

Education
Medical school: University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, 2002
Residency: University of Chicago Hospitals, 2006 (Chief resident final year)
in practice since: 2006

Personal
Family includes husband, Michael Derick, and two sons, Charlie (3) and Henry (1). Derick enjoys spending time with her family and supporting the Women’s Dermatologic Society.

What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?
You have two basic career choices: be an employee, or be an entrepreneur. Each career choice has pros and cons. Your decision will be shaped by how much capital you have to invest, your appetite for risk, your natural talents and preferences, and overall luck and timing. My key advice is to be honest with yourself, choose the position that naturally fits you, and try to achieve overall balance in your life.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job or job search?
I started my practice from scratch immediately after residency. What surprised me most was how much “business” is involved in running a dermatology practice. Just mastering the non-clinical elements of practice administration is a full-time job.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?
An increased focus on the practical side of dermatology would have been helpful. Learning how to deal with conflict, understanding how to develop relationships with patients, and grasping the nuances of billing issues are the key areas that come to mind.

Anything particularly unique about your job search?
The launch of my practice was a team effort. My parents and husband were supportive of my decision and were helpful in the process. I think it would be a lot for someone to take on individually, both from a financial and administrative perspective. I encourage younger physicians to seek out mentors for guidance and support.

Any other advice?
The reason my practice works so well for me is that it fits my style and priorities. I like to be in control of my environment, and I have extremely high expectations for myself and my staff. The extra effort required to manage my own practice is well worth it from my perspective.

 

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DeVry Anderson, M.D.

By PracticeLink Staff | Snapshot | Summer 2011

 

DeVry Anderson, M.D., Chief medical officer, CEO, owner: Quick Care Walk In Clinic; brigade surgeon, Warrior Transition Brigade, Fort Hood, TX

 

Work

Chief medical officer, CEO, owner: Quick Care Walk In Clinic; brigade surgeon, Warrior Transition Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas

Education

MEDICAL SCHOOL: Thomas Jefferson Medical College, 2000

INTERNSHIP: Completed an orthopaedic internship in 2000.

RESIDENCY: Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, Fort Hood, Texas

IN PRACTICE SINCE: Practiced as a military surgeon until returning to family medicine residency in 2006. more »

 

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Joshua D. Lenchus, D.O.

By PracticeLink Staff | Snapshot

 

Joshua Lenchus, D.O.

 

Work
Assistant professor of clinical medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; associate program director, Jackson Memorial Hospital Internal Medicine Residency Training Program; associate director, UM-JMH Center for Patient Safety.

Education
MEDICAL SCHOOL: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine
INTERNSHIP: Broward General Medical Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
RESIDENCY: Internal medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami
IN PRACTICE SINCE:  2004 more »

 

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Akash Sharma, M.D.

By PracticeLink Staff | Snapshot | Winter 2011

 

Akash Sharma, M.D., with his daughters

Work
Assistant professor, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.

Education
MEDICAL SCHOOL: Ross University School of Medicine, West Indies
RESIDENCY: Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn.
FELLOWSHIP: One-year fellowship in nuclear radiology after general radiology residency
IN PRACTICE SINCE: July 2004

Personal
Married with three daughters, including a set of twins. Hobbies include travel, photography, reading, being a tech junkie and studying. Sharma just finished an MBA program and plans to study finance and writing next. more »

 

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Dr. Obinna Egbo

This physician’s job-search advice? Make sure you make the effort to really understand your job description before accepting a position.

By PracticeLink Staff | Snapshot

 

Practice group leader for IPC at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

WORK
Practice group leader for IPC at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. Honored as a Hospitalist of the Year in 2009.

EDUCATION
Med school: College of Medical Sciences and Dentistry, University of Nigeria
Residency: University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital
In practice since: 2005

PERSONAL
Married with five children, and living in Phoenix. Hobbies include soccer and watching all sports on TV, reading and travelling.

YOUR ADVICE
What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?
Before beginning a job search, take the time to assess the type of medical practice that will suit you. Think about the potential long-term consequences of your choice, and decide if you will thrive as a hospitalist, outpatient clinician or in a traditional practice that combines both. Regardless of what type of practice that you choose, a basic understanding of the business aspect of medicine will be invaluable—so, make sure that you have it. more »

 

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