Christine Bourbeau, FASPR

Snapshot | Summer 2016

 

Christine Bourbeau

Recruiter Christine Bourbeau

Director, Physician Recruitment

Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center

Hartford, Connecticut

Bourbeau, a Connecticut native, has been recruiting physicians for more than 25 years. Learn more about her opportunities by contacting her at cbourbea@stfranciscare.org or through PracticeLink.com.

What surprises physicians the most about their first job search? How ill-prepared they are for it. They don’t learn about preparing for an interview in residency or fellowship; there’s no class that prepares them for a formal interview.

How can physicians better prepare for their job search? Prepare themselves for being asked more behavioral interview questions. We’re not just asking them what they want to do and how many patients they want to see in a day; we’re looking for the right fit, and the behavioral interview questions help us to learn more about the physician and how they will interact with their patients and colleagues. They should leave the interview feeling that they have gathered together all of the information they need to make the right decision.

How has the recruitment experience for physicians evolved over the years? When I first started out recruiting more than 25 years ago, 95 percent of the physicians would come to town, buy a house and settle down. Now, the majority of doctors that I’m recruiting are renting first to see if the job is going to work out and if their family is going to be happy in the area.

What’s most important for you when recruiting physicians to your community? That they will fit in with the people they will be working with. First impressions are lasting impressions. There’s a lot of information we as recruiters gather from the physician after spending a day or two with them, and this information is just as valuable as the “formal” interview process.

How does PracticeLink help? When a physician asks me for help identifying a job that’s not in my community or state, I always ask them, “Are you registered with PracticeLink?” I tell them that it’s where they need to go to find their job. I explain that it’s a way for them to deal with in-house recruiters like myself—you don’t have to sign up with an agency. I tell them that 95 percent of the people who do what I do use PracticeLink. I’m always pushing them to PracticeLink.

 

0 Comments

Shaun Jester, D.O.

Snapshot | Spring 2016

 

Title: OB/GYN and physician laborist

Employer: Covenant Medical Group in Lubbock, Texas

Shaun Jester DO

Shaun Jester, D.O., recently relocated from Pennsylvania to Texas after finding a new opportunity on PracticeLink.com.

Med School: University of North Texas Health Science Center – Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (1999)

Residency: Crozer-Chester Medical Center (2000–2004)

Jester and his family—wife, Lara, and children, Grace and Hope—recently relocated from Pennsylvania to Lubbock, Texas, where he’s now a laborist at Covenant Women’s and Children’s Hospital. Jester is also a former U.S. patent holder, church deacon, and is active in pro-life crisis pregnancy work, anti-sex trafficking efforts and domestic violence prevention.

What’s your advice for residents beginning their search? Don’t settle! There are literally hundreds and hundreds of job opportunities (over 800 on the PracticeLink website for OB/GYN jobs alone!). My wife and I settled on my first job, rather than waiting for one we were both really excited about and felt God’s call. Not surprisingly, the job turned out to only last 10 months, as it was a bad fit.

How did PracticeLink help you in your job search? I was able to begin my search on PracticeLink and find a great match within a few weeks. It was nice to have the ability to look for jobs within very specific or broad parameters, depending on my needs.

The PracticeLink physician relations team gave me personal attention, too. My PracticeLink service representative, Brandon, helped me tailor my search to maximize my options as well as inform employers who were looking for someone like me. PracticeLink is a great service; I’ve already told colleagues.

Any other advice? When you are seeking a job, decide if you want to be private, employed, academic or locums. Find out who your partners will be, and don’t be afraid to research them.

You want to think of this as finding a great match. A bad work life can often spill over into your personal life, and life is too short to waste it on a bad work fit. With so many options, there is a good fit for everyone.

 

0 Comments

Cristiana Angelelli, M.D.

Snapshot | Winter 2016

 

Specialty: Family Medicine

Employer: Baylor Scott & White Health

Residency: UT Houston Family Medicine, 2014

In practice since: October, 2015

Angelelli enjoys swimming, SUP, live music and traveling.

Christiana Angelelli

Cristiana Angelelli found a job in the location she wanted—near her family—by using PracticeLink.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job search?

It was not as easy as I had pictured during residency to find that ideal job I was searching for, my best fit.

What’s your advice for residents beginning their job searches?

Depending on if they are a U.S. citizen or foreign medical graduate, their medical license status, etc., some people may need to start the process earlier than others. Be proactive, always keep your options open, and search for the type of work that would truly make you the most happy.

What was the most important factor in your search for a new job?

Location. I wanted to be in my city and close to my family. I also wanted a healthy work/life balance.

How did you find your job?

Shortly after signing up on PracticeLink, I received a call from an in-house recruiter who found my profile on the site.

Anything particularly unique about your job search?

You have to be prepared for a sometimes overwhelming amount of emails, calls, letters, etc. from recruiters from all over the country. It is ideal to already have an idea of the basics you are looking for and be able to narrow your search (and also, therefore, the amount of people contacting you).

How did PracticeLink help you in your job search?

PracticeLink has been greatly helpful in my job search. Once I uploaded my profile on PracticeLink, the job offers started taking off. I very quickly received a job offer from a recognized institution in the city I was looking for and have now signed the job! Thank you, PracticeLink! It got me the job I wanted.

 

0 Comments

Ambiga Samiappan, M.D.

Fall 2015 | Snapshot

 

Ambiga Samiappan

Ambiga Samiappan, M.D.

Work: Hospitalist in practice since August 2015

Employer: PinnacleHealth in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Residency: Internal Medicine, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia

Samiappan enjoys dancing, fashion, shopping, writing, movies and music.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job search?

There were so many opportunities out there. It was difficult to try to narrow down the search and help find the job that I like. With the help of PracticeLink, this was not a challenge anymore. The job hunt was a lot easier.

What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?

They should start asking themselves what are they looking for in terms of geographic location, salary, working schedule, etc., then explore the available options. Just be yourself and be honest about who you are.

What was the most important factor in your search for a new job?

I wanted to stay in Pennsylvania, and I wanted to join an institution where people were friendly, honest and nice to work with. I also wanted a 7 on/7 off schedule.

How did you find your job?

It was so simple. All I did was join PracticeLink, and I found my dream job within a month of joining.

How did PracticeLink help you in your job search?

It’s a great network that helped narrow the job opportunities available based on what I was looking for. They also helped send out my CV to the places I was interested in, and they provided the contact information of recruiters who worked at the hospital. PinnacleHealth was able to reach out to me, and I interviewed and got the job.

Any other advice?

Searching for your dream job can be a challenge, but the important thing is to know what you want and to be positive. With the help of PracticeLink, you are sure to find what you are looking for!

 

0 Comments

Joseph Cheatle, M.D.

Snapshot | Summer 2015

 

WORK: Neurosurgeon in practice since 2014

EMPLOYER: Grand Strand Spine & Neuro Care, Myrtle Beach, S.C.

RESIDENCY: Neurological Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center

MED SCHOOL: University of Nebraska Medical Center, 2008

Cheatle enjoys outdoor activities, hiking, running, swimming and spending time with his wife, Jenny, and their young children, Jack and Scarlett.

Jos Cheatle with Family

Cheatle with family.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job search?

I was most surprised at the length of time each step took. In general, it is a good idea to start all paperwork as soon as possible. It can take months to work through bureaucracies at hospitals and through state licensing agencies. The folks at PracticeLink called me and ensured I knew about the requirements for licensing and to start the paperwork early. They were very helpful.

What’s your advice for residents?

The interview is huge for meeting your potential partners—the people you are going to be working with for potentially the next few decades. They cover your patients on call. You want your partners to be collegial and willing to collaborate and be of assistance when you need it. If you pick a practice where you like your partners, you are much more likely to stay.

What was the most important factor in your search?

When push came to shove, ultimately I had to choose somewhere I would be able to practice successfully and my wife and family are happy.

I found the job I ultimately accepted through a PracticeLink email. I got connected to the in-house recruiter for the job through the PracticeLink website.

How did PracticeLink help you in your job search?

PracticeLink was wonderful about updating me about new opportunities as they became available via email and let me customize my job search easily on the website. They even included my wife in the job-search process.

PracticeLink was not only helpful in listing so many opportunities in one convenient location, but they also helped guide me through the licensure and credentialing process early on. I still read PracticeLink Magazine to keep up to date about the business side of medicine.

 

0 Comments

Oluwakemi Ajide, M.D.

Snapshot | Winter 2015

 

Oluwakemi Ajide, M.D.

Oluwakemi Ajide, M.D.

WORK: Family Practice physician at MedStar Medical Group, Aberdeen, Maryland

MED SCHOOL: George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, May 2011

RESIDENCY: Chestnut Hill Hospital/UPenn Community Health, June 2014

Ajide enjoys traveling, knitting and crocheting and is a foodie.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job or job search?

The job search is very different from applying for medical school or residency. Our training does not prepare us for how to search for jobs. There are lots of job opportunities, but it is difficult at times to narrow down which job will suit you best.

What’s your advice for residents who are beginning their job search?

Start early. Write down a list of the qualities you are looking for in a job and star the qualities that are non-negotiable. …You do not have to accept the interview offer for every job presented.

What was the most important factor in your search for a new job?

Location, location, location. I was looking for a long-term job, so I was looking for a job in a location that worked best for me and my spouse.

How did you find your job?

I contacted the different recruiters for major health care providers in the Maryland/DC/Virginia area. It was in this way I was able to find which jobs they were currently recruiting for.

I used career engines such as PracticeLink to see which opportunities were available in my preferred locations. Then I contacted the internal recruiters directly. I did not use a third-party recruiter throughout the process.

How did PracticeLink help you in your job search?

I set up a profile with PracticeLink and got emails regarding job opportunities that fit my profile. One of those emails was from my current job!

Any other advice?

Try not to stress too much about your job search. You will definitely get a job. Ask lots of questions. Do not settle for less than what you deserve.

 

0 Comments

Andrea Gregory, M.D.

Snapshot | Spring 2015

 

Dr. Andrea Gregory

Andrea Gregory, M.D.

WORK: Pediatrician, in practice since October, 2014

EMPLOYER: Montgomery Center for Family Medicine at Self Regional Healthcare, Greenwood, South Carolina

RESIDENCY: Vidant Medical Center in Greenville, North Carolina (2013)

MED SCHOOL: Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University (2010)

Gregory enjoys reading, running, skiing, cooking and spending time with family. “I would love to learn to play the guitar— which I should now have time for since residency is over,” she says.

What surprised you about your first post-residency job search?

Prior to going to medical school, I worked as a registered dietitian for four years. The job search as a physician was quite different. Rather than having to search out jobs, there are so many recruiters and agencies that contacted me. It was somewhat overwhelming at times.

What’s your advice for residents?

Starting early is helpful—it gives you more time to find the job that’s right for you. It’s also important to be honest with yourself about what type of job is the best fit for you. There are so many options available. I found it helpful to narrow my search in one category. I chose location, but others may want to look for inpatient vs. outpatient, private or academic, or traditional hours vs. shift work.

What was the most important factor in your search?

For me, location was the most important factor. I was looking to live and work somewhere that would be near extended family and would have good career opportunities for my husband, who is not in the medical field. I was also looking for a job that would foster good work/life balance and would allow me to do some teaching.

How did you find your job?

During residency, I planned to subspecialize in pediatric infectious diseases. I started my fellowship in July 2013, but after about 6 months, I realized that an academic subspecialty career was not the right fit for me. So I started my job search in general pediatrics while I was completing the first year of fellowship. I was extremely busy during this time, so having a service like PracticeLink was invaluable. I found several openings that seemed promising—and one that seemed ideal, with a great mix of inpatient, outpatient and resident teaching responsibilities. Being able to speak directly with the physicians and staff at my top choice expedited my search and ultimately my decision.

Any other advice?

Financially, it’s a good idea to plan carefully in case you aren’t able to start as early as you’d like or your job search takes a little longer—or if you want to have an extended time off between residency and the start of your new job. (It may be one of the last opportunities to take several months off to study, travel, etc.) It’s also nice to build in a little extra time if you are relocating, so you can get settled at home before settling in to a new job.

 

0 Comments

Wilkerson “Will” Compere, M.D.

Fall 2014 | Snapshot

 

Dr. Wilkerson Compere

“I signed my contract with Penn Highlands Healthcare, which I found on PracticeLink.com. From PracticeLink, I was able to get a list of opportunities that provided loan assistance.” —Will Compere, M.D.

WORK: Penn Highlands Healthcare in Clearfield, Pennsylvania

RESIDENCY: Capital Health System, Trenton, N.J.

Compere is an Internist who enjoys playing soccer and basketball, spending time with his family and watching movies.

What’s your advice for residents beginning their job search?

Start the job search early. Don’t wait when you are at the end of the final year of your residency to look for a job. You will have less time than you think to explore other opportunities. Keep your options open, and don’t focus on only one location because sometimes you will be pleased to find a better offer or quality of life somewhere else. Lastly, involve your family and choose the offer that will be best for you and your family.

What surprised you about your post-residency job search?

There are plenty of opportunities, but you don’t know which one to choose. It’s very time-consuming, as you need to travel to many places for interview. Also, the wide gap between salaries from state to state.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?

More training in the business aspect of heath care, and more lectures about the cost of health care because we are the future of health care.

How did PracticeLink help you in your job search?

I signed my contract with Penn Highlands Healthcare, which I found on PracticeLink.com. From PracticeLink, I was also able to get a list of opportunities that provided loan assistance.

Any other advice?

Be positive and honest. Know that you are in control. If you are not interested in an offer, be polite and let them know so they can move on to the next applicant. Make sure everything they promise is written into your contract.

Start early, and be confident. All the late nights you spent studying during medical school and all the calls during residency will pay off. Be proud of everything that you have accomplished.

 

0 Comments

Ryan Becker, M.D.

Snapshot | Summer 2014

 

WORK: Starts practice as a family medicine physician in Sheldon, Iowa, for Sanford Health System in August 2014.

EDUCATION/TRAINING:

Medical school: University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Medicine (May 2011)

Residency: UNMC, Family Medicine, Omaha (June 2014)

Becker is a physician and private pilot who enjoys golf, traveling and working on his family’s farm. He is a Captain/Flight Surgeon in the 155th Air Refueling Wing in the Nebraska Air National Guard; Resident Director on the Nebraska Academy of Family Physicians’ Board of Directors; and UNMC Department of Family Medicine Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Committee Resident Member. He and his wife, Rachael, have a son, Eli.

What’s your advice for residents beginning their job search?

Start looking and learning early during your residency. There are pros and cons to starting early. A pro is that you will have ample time to find the right community and practice with plenty of time to negotiate contracts. A con is that you will be inundated with opportunities and offers from all over the country for a while as you’re searching.

What surprised you about your post-residency job search?

Searching for a job to begin after residency was more of a paradigm shift than a surprise. Throughout my life, the tables were turned. Did I get accepted into my ideal college, medical school, residency program? I was more so ‘told’ where to go to further my medical training. Now the ball is in my court. My family and I get to seek out and choose our next location to essentially begin our lives.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?

An exposure to the business of medicine is always needed more in medical school. There is a reason why doctors struggle with business. We are so focused on medicine; we don’t have a lot of spare time to become businessmen and businesswomen. If possible, getting a Masters in Business Administration would be helpful.

Anything particularly unique about your job search?

When approached by a potential employer or recruiter, I would initially Google the location and determine if my family could see ourselves living in that particular area. Then I would email the recruiter, CEO, etc. a question document to basically screen the opportunity. If the answers to the questions looked appropriate, then I would establish a more serious discussion about visiting the location and interviewing. This way of searching allowed me to trim down the list of opportunities for various reasons. I felt this was a good way to efficiently make use of my time and theirs.

Any other advice?

Remain in control of your job search. Ultimately, you are in control. We are good people looking for good jobs. You are looking for a place that satisfies your own needs as a physician but also your family’s needs. If your family will be comfortable and enjoys your next community setting, everyone is happy!

 

0 Comments

Amanda Reese, D.O.

By Amanda Reese, D.O. | Snapshot | Spring 2014

 

Amanda Reese and her family

“I read [PracticeLink Magazine] religiously and used it to prepare for my interview and to tailor questions to ask potential employers. The magazine articles gave me confidence and courage to ask for the things that I wanted.” –Amdana Reese, D.O.

WORK: General surgeon in practice since 2013. Community Health Systems, Bluefield Regional Medical Center, Bluefield, W.Va.

EDUCATION/TRAINING:
Medical school: Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine (2008)

Residency: Carilion Clinic-Virginia Tech, General Surgery Residency Program, Roanoke, Va. (2013)

Reese enjoys Crossfit, skiing, gymnastics and outdoor activities. She also enjoys spending time with her family—husband Phillip and their daughters, Braelyn and Gabrielle.

What’s your advice for residents beginning their job search?

Make sure to have a clear understanding of what you are looking for before you begin the search. Consider location, size of practice, call responsibilities, size of hospital, supporting staff/specialties before you begin to look. It will narrow the field considerably and make the search manageable.

What surprised you about your post-residency job search?

I was surprised that hospital recruiters pursued me! I was recruited more than one year prior to graduation, which was a nice change from the stress of applications, test scores and requests for recommendation letters. For once I could be picky and make demands for what I was looking for.

What do you wish they had taught in med school but didn’t?

I wish medical school would have taught me how to write orders and a systematic process for working through acute patient problems. I wish residency would have prepared me for the business side of practice, including billing, coding, networking with other physicians and advertising.

Anything particularly unique about your job search?

I read [PracticeLink Magazine] religiously and used it to prepare for my interview and to tailor questions to ask potential employers. The magazine articles gave me confidence and courage to ask for the things that I wanted.

Any other advice?

Talk to nurses, staff, drug/equipment representatives, other physicians and everyone else that you can about your practice of interest. You will find out the good, bad and ugly about a job. Also, ask your mentors the things that they considered when deciding between various positions. Hearing other people’s experiences may help you avoid pitfalls.

 

0 Comments

 

Return to Top

Page 2 of 41234