The Whole Truth

It can be lucrative and exciting, but being an expert witness isn't always easy.

By Julie Sturgeon | Feature Articles | November/December 2008

 

Taking the Stand — Is expert witness work for you?

Taking the Stand — Is expert witness work for you?

It looks glamorous on our television screens each week: Physicians in a seat of authority in the courtroom, pointing the finger at the bad guy in a calm, cool style. They are Matlock’s right-hand men and women, Arthur Branch’s buddies. But in real-life courtrooms from New York City to Atlanta, Las Vegas to Miami, the drama surrounding expert witness services is tame—until the physician exits the courthouse doors.

When it comes to taking the stand, the American Medical Association is in favor of it, and actually encourages members to serve as impartial expert witnesses. The AMA is, however, on the record in favor of medical associations punishing those physicians who violate pre-set ethical standards. In a nutshell, it considers expert witness activities to be the same as practicing medicine, so what you say on the stand is subject to peer review. Individual medical societies put out statements using different words, but they boil down to similar sentiments. more »

 

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Endangered No More

Whether it's a convenient service for travelers or wealthy clients or a replacement for office visits for the elderly or homebound, house calls are making a comeback.

By Marcia Travelstead | Feature Articles | November/December 2008

 

 John Horning, MD, has filled a niche treating travelers and less-mobile locals in the San Francisco Bay area through his business, Urgent Med Housecalls.

John Horning, MD, has filled a niche treating travelers and less-mobile locals in the San Francisco Bay area through his business, Urgent Med Housecalls.

Do you ever feel overwhelmed struggling with your workload in an office-based practice? Do you wish you had the time to build better and deeper client relationships versus seeing a steady string of patients in a normal workday? Changing from an office-based practice to home care practice by making house calls may be the answer.

Aren’t house calls more or less a thing of the past? Actually, that’s far from the truth. House calls used to be common a generation ago, but traveling made them impractical. However, in the last several years, doctors are finding creative ways to make them viable again.

The American Academy of Home Care Physicians (AAHCP), located in Edgewood, Maryland, has served the needs of thousands of physicians and related professionals and agencies interested in improving patients’ health in the home for more than 20 years. According to AAHCP statistics, for every elderly person in a nursing home, there are three equally infirm seniors living at home. Home health has become the fastest growing segment of Medicare’s budget. According to the Center for Medicare Services (CMS) Medicare National Procedure Summary Data File, the number of house calls paid by Medicare has increased by 100,000 per year since 2001. Although it leveled off in 2004 and 2005, it began to rise again in 2006.
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The ABC’s of CIC’s (Captive Insurance Companies)

For the right type of practice, with proper set-up and maintenance, our case study shows that captive insurance companies can be a vital part of doctors' financial plans.

By David B. Mandell, JD, MBA & Claudio A. Devellis, JD, CPA | Legal Matters | November/December 2008

 

As frequent speakers to physicians on asset protection and advanced planning, we are often asked about captive insurance companies (CICs). Certainly, CICs can be ideal tools if they are created for the right type of practice and are established and maintained properly. In this article, we will examine the benefits and costs of CICs and then demonstrate a case study of two doctors who use CICs to significantly enhance many areas of his comprehensive financial planning. more »

 

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Wearable High-Tech Professional Gear

New technology you can wear or use every day is gaining popularity among medical professionals.

By David Geer | November/December 2008 | Tech Notes

 

Scott eVest

Scott eVest

High-tech clothes may not make the doctor, but they make your workday. From coats and vests with seamless pockets for every device to wearable wireless communication badges and computer access cards, designers have fashioned these high-tech garments and accessories to put your schedule and bedside manner into high gear:

Scott eVest coats and vests

As a medical researcher, Jeffrey D. Rothstein MD, PhD, director of the Brain Science Institute Neurotranslation Program at Johns Hopkins University, travels frequently on business. To make flights and boarding fast and productive, he never leaves the ground without his vests, coats, and jackets from Scott eVest (SeV). more »

 

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Riverside, CA – Orange Groves and Beyond

In Riverside, of California's Inland Empire, "green" is replacing "orange" as the dominant color - including verdant pastures for physicians.

By Eileen Lockwood | Live & Practice | November/December 2008

 

Built between 1902 and 1932, and now considered to be Riverside’s “symbol,” the Mission Inn is a masterpiece mixture of Mission and Spanish Revival, Moorish, and Asian architectural styles.

Built between 1902 and 1932, and now considered to be Riverside’s “symbol,” the Mission Inn is a masterpiece mixture of Mission and Spanish Revival, Moorish, and Asian architectural styles.

You could say Riverside’s march to prosperity started with Mrs. Eliza Tibbets. In the early 1870s she planted two navel orange trees sent from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Citrus growing wasn’t new to California’s Inland Empire, now made up of San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, 50 miles west of Los Angeles. Missionaries planted oranges around 1800, and lemon growers helped stave off scurvy among Gold Rush prospectors. But Mrs. Tibbets’ trees were special—Brazilian Bahia navels—with the sweetest flavor around and, another plus, no seeds.

The orange trees loved the climate and soil, and soon more and more people were loving their fruit. Groves spread throughout the region, and California’s Second Gold Rush was off and running.

The juicy crop went national when rail service arrived, and the first commercial refrigerated freight shipment proceeded to points near and far in 1887. California citrus groves multiplied from 3,000 to 40,000 acres. In 1893, growers organized a co-op that would become Sunkist Growers, Inc. Riverside became known as the Citrus Capital of the World. more »

 

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The Science and Art of Finding Your Best Job

Career opportunities abound—be as smart about finding them as you have been in your education.

By Brett Walker | November/December 2008 | Remarks

 

As a physician you dedicate much of your young adult life learning everything you need to know to be a physician. Choosing the right undergraduate education; taking the right  pre-med classes; passing the M-CAT exam; four years of medical school; residency match process; long hours and difficult rotations during residency; fellowship applications and  matching process; fellowship program and, for some, even advanced fellowship training. Let’s face it: the road to being a physician is a long and hard-fought battle. The same holds true for navigating your job search. more »

 

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Wrapping it Up

By Mollie Vento Hudson, Editor | Editor's Note | November/December 2008

 

Mollie Vento Hudson, Editor

Mollie Vento Hudson, Editor

As the year winds down, many of us automatically take stock of what has transpired in the past 12 months—what were the high points, which events make us glad to close the books on  what has surely been an eventful year for the nation, politically and economically. Election rhetoric and minute-by-minute analysis of the country’s financial crisis clog the airwaves and the Internet.

This time of year offers distraction, of course, in holiday traditions. One of my favorite parts of Christmas is wrapping the gifts that will land in the hands of my nieces and nephews (and now great-nieces and great-nephews!). I detest shopping, but I get a thrill out of wrapping a game or a toy in colorful paper, fashioning some version of homemade bow, and adding a gift tag made for that child. Maybe it’s a picture of 1-year-old Drew with his favorite truck or a piece of pink fabric stamped with pink letters because pink is 5-year-old Olivia’s signature color. It takes me forever, but it’s a treat compared to writing Christmas cards, which is a chore. more »

 

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